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Music Schools

Music Schools Help You Find Your Voice

Do you have a great singing voice? Do you play one or more musical instruments well? And are you prepared to travel a lot and work strange hours? If you answered yes on more than one of those questions and you want a job in the music industry, music schools and classes provide instrumental or voice training that sets you apart from the crowd.

There are plenty of good musicians; simply having a nice voice or being able to play an instrument will not be enough to create a demand for your music in this extremely competitive job market. Music schools offer classes and courses to help you earn a certificate, diploma, or degree and turn your natural talent into something extraordinary--a skill.

Tune up Your Resume with Music School Training

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the job field for salaried musicians is expected to grow at the average pace for all jobs: about 10 percent between 2006 and 2016. Approximately 196,000 people worked in singing or instrumental music in 2006, and BLS expects about 20,000 additional salaried musicians to join the work force by 2016. For self-employed musicians, however--such as those who perform in small local venues at night--the number of jobs is projected to increase by only about 5 percent.

In 2006, the median hourly wage for musicians who specialized in singing or instrumental music was $28.28, as compared to composers and directors, who earned a median hourly wage of $26.36. Of the wage- and salary-earning musicians, more than a third work for religious organizations.

To be considered for the highest-paying jobs in the music industry, make sure you get the training that only an accredited music school can provide. Courses designed to help you fine-tune your talent can turn into a certificate, diploma, or degree. Just as importantly, they'll help make you a star in your own career.

Music Schools